[title size=”3″ content_align=”left” style_type=”default” sep_color=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” class=”” id=””]AND GOD SAID NO[/title][fusion_text]

We understand that God speaks through His Word today (Ephesians 6:17), and not directly, but this article imagines God’s response to one’s prayers.

[imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”bottomshadow” hover_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”10″ stylecolor=”” align=”right” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][/imageframe]I asked God to take away my pride, and God said, “No.” He said it was not for Him to take away, but for me to give up.

I asked God to make my handicapped child whole, and God said, “No.” He said her spirit is whole; her body is only temporary.

I asked God to grant me patience, and God said “No.” He said patience is a by-product of tribulation. It isn’t granted; it’s earned.

I asked God to give me happiness, and God said, “No.” He gives blessings; happiness is up to me.

I asked God to spare me pain, and  God said, “No.” He said, “Suffering draws you apart from worldly cares and brings you closer to Me.”

I asked God to make my spirit grow, and God said, “No.” He said I must grow on my own, but He will prune me to make me fruitful.

I asked God to help me love others as much as He loves me,

and God said, “Ah, finally, you have the idea.” Claudia Minden Weisz

“Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven” (Matthew 6:10).

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The preciousness of a book may sometimes best be estimated if we consider the loss which we should experience if we did not possess it. If so, we can hardly value the Acts of the Apostles too much. If it had not come down to us, there would have been a blank in our knowledge which scarcely anything else could have filled up. —Farrar.

If the Book of the Acts were gone, there would be nothing to replace it; and we may go further, that the Christian Scriptures would then lie before us in two disjointed fragments; the complete arch would not be built. —Howson. From Explore the Book, J. Sidlow Baxter

[/fusion_text][separator style_type=”single|dashed” top_margin=”15″ bottom_margin=”15″ sep_color=”” border_size=”” icon=”” icon_circle=”” icon_circle_color=”” width=”50%” alignment=”center” class=”” id=””][title size=”3″ content_align=”left” style_type=”default” sep_color=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” class=”” id=””]I KNOW WHAT I’M TALKING ABOUT[/title][fusion_text]

While she was enjoying a transatlantic ocean trip, Billie Burke, a famous actress at the time, noticed that a gentleman at the next table was suffering from a bad cold. “Are you uncomfortable?” she asked sympathetically. The man nodded. “I’ll tell you just what to do for it,” she offered. “Go back to your room and drink lots of orange juice. Take two aspirin. Cover yourself with all the blankets you can find. Sweat the cold out. I know just what I’m talking about. I’m Billie Burke from Hollywood.” The man smiled warmly and introduced himself in return. “Thanks,” he said, “I’m Dr. Mayo from the Mayo clinic.”

They say it takes 10,000 hours of practice and experience before a person becomes an expert. Bits & Pieces, March 3, 1994, p. 24.

“My brethren, count it all joy when ye fall into divers temptations; knowing this, that the trying of your faith worketh patience. But let patience have her perfect work, that ye may be perfect and entire, wanting nothing. If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not; and it shall be given him” (James 1:2–5).

[/fusion_text][separator style_type=”single|dashed” top_margin=”15″ bottom_margin=”15″ sep_color=”” border_size=”” icon=”” icon_circle=”” icon_circle_color=”” width=”50%” alignment=”center” class=”” id=””][title size=”3″ content_align=”left” style_type=”default” sep_color=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” class=”” id=””]A GOOD CATCH[/title][fusion_text]

What should a single Christian look for in a mate?

THE VIRTUOUS WIFE

  1. Trustworthy (Proverbs 31:11). The husband can safely entrust her with his income. She will not squander what he gives her, but will use it in a manner that benefits them both.
  2. Filled with an enduring love (Proverbs 31:12). Devoted to doing her husband good all her life just as she vowed in the wedding ceremony.
  3. Has practical skills (Proverbs 31:13–15, 21–22) such as sewing and cooking.
  4. Industrious (Proverbs 31:16, 24). Makes investments (buys land and plants a vineyard). Provides extra income (makes clothing and sells to merchants).
  5. Compassionate (Proverbs 31:20). Helping the poor; reaching out to the needy.
  6. Strong character (Proverbs 31:25). Character matters, and she has developed a strong one just as Peter stressed (1 Peter 3:3–4).
  7. Speaks words of wisdom and kindness (Proverbs 31:26). She is thus concerned about what proceeds from her mouth just as Paul stressed (Ephesians 4:29).
  8. Diligently sees to her family’s needs (Proverbs 31:27). Makes whatever preparation necessary (cf. Proverbs 31:15) so that her family does not go in want (cf. Proverbs 31:21).
  9. Fears the Lord (Proverbs 31:29–30).  She understands that this quality is more important and praiseworthy than physical beauty. With the fear of the Lord, she has the potential for great wisdom (Proverbs 1:7).
  10. A wife that is not contentious (cf. Proverbs 21:9, 19) or hateful (Proverbs 30:21–23).

THE VIRTUOUS HUSBAND

Where’s the passage describing the virtuous man? is a question often raised by women. Bear in mind that the Proverbs are primarily addressed to Solomon’s son. So while there is half a chapter describing the virtuous woman, there are thirty chapters describing the virtuous man. If followed, the book produces a husband any woman would love.

The Ideal Husband

  1. Values his wife highly (Proverbs 18:22; 19:14). He realizes that she is a gift from God (especially when she proves to be prudent).
  2. Gives his wife her due (Proverbs 31:31). Allows his wife the opportunity to develop her own abilities and lets her reap the benefits of her own labors (i.e., does not treat her simply as an appendage of himself).
  3. Praises his wife profusely (Proverbs 31:28–29). Praises her frequently and does not take her for granted.
  4. Trusts his wife implicitly (Proverbs 31:11). Demonstrates a willingness to trust her in such areas as her intelligence, her faithfulness, her abilities. He is not jealous or suspicious.
  5. Content with his wife’s love (Proverbs 5:15–21). He does not look elsewhere. This will save him and his family much harm. Mark Copeland

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